Quote
"Today, in the field of women’s studies, as elsewhere,
Anglo-Saxon countries exert a virtual monopoly on knowledge dissemination and its evaluation. This hegemony leads to the marginalization of large segments of feminist thought worldwide and also reinforces the isolation of researchers on the national or linguistic periphery by limiting their capacity to enter into a dialogue with the center or to advance their ideas."

Language Is Not Neutral: The Construction of Knowledge in the Social Sciences and Humanities
Francine Descarries

Signs , Vol. 39, No. 3 (Spring 2014) , pp. 564-569

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As a special open-access feature in conjunction with the comparative perspective symposium on “Translation, Feminist Scholarship, and the Hegemony of English,” Signs and the University of Chicago Press are making five of the symposium essays available in international languages. Visit the Signs blog for links to essays in Chinese, French, Malayalam, and Spanish. Or download them as a single PDF via JSTOR (click “View PDF”). The English versions are also available to subscribers via JSTOR. 

As a special open-access feature in conjunction with the comparative perspective symposium on “Translation, Feminist Scholarship, and the Hegemony of English,” Signs and the University of Chicago Press are making five of the symposium essays available in international languages. Visit the Signs blog for links to essays in Chinese, French, Malayalam, and Spanish. Or download them as a single PDF via JSTOR (click “View PDF”). The English versions are also available to subscribers via JSTOR

Photo
Kim Anno, photograph, National Geographic in fish tank, with ink and debris, 20” x 30” (2010). © 2010 by Kim Anno.
Permission to reprint may be obtained only from the artist. This work appears on the Spring 2014 issue of Signs.
In this photograph, Anno recognizes the complex history of national geographic magazine with its colonial past and environmental-action present and uses the sublime character of falling ink a tank of water to spoil it.

Kim Anno, photograph, National Geographic in fish tank, with ink and debris, 20” x 30” (2010). © 2010 by Kim Anno.

Permission to reprint may be obtained only from the artist. This work appears on the Spring 2014 issue of Signs.

In this photograph, Anno recognizes the complex history of national geographic magazine with its colonial past and environmental-action present and uses the sublime character of falling ink a tank of water to spoil it.

Quote
"At a moment when governmental discourses threaten to flatten and fix all representations of patriarchal power and struggles against it, it becomes doubly important to turn toward the antigovernmentalizing effects of feminist literature."

Getting beyond the Governmental Fix in Kerala, J. Devika
Signs , Vol. 39, No. 3 (Spring 2014) , pp. 580-584
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"The assumption that English is the language of feminist research and scholarship does not do justice to the variety and vitality of autochthonous feminist cultures across many regions of the globe, including Europe. Unless we acknowledge the need to support transnational feminism with a firm commitment to multilingualism, the dominant English-speaking feminist scholarly community erases or confines to the margins a large number of excellent and politically significant non-English-speaking feminists."

Thinking with an Accent: Françoise Collin, Les cahiers du Grif, and French Feminism, Rosi Braidotti

Signs , Vol. 39, No. 3 (Spring 2014) , pp. 597-626

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"Intended to dissimulate, the veil ends up exposing, and in so doing it oversexualizes women, confirming the presence of an inegalitarian gender system based on sexual difference and sexual inequality."

Intimacy Surveilled: Religion, Sex, and Secular Cunning

Mayanthi L. Fernando

Signs, Vol. 39, No. 3 (Spring 2014), pp. 685-708

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"To the extent that violent masculine identities stem from racist institutions and practices and from inadequate resources within the dark ghetto, it is unreasonable to expect boys and men simply to refrain from violence. And to the extent that institutional deficiencies stem from racist dynamics in society at large, it does not make sense to impose the obligation to address violence on the black community alone."

Telling It Just Like It Is: The Tragicomedy of the 1965 Voting Rights Act

Stephen Houston Marshall

Signs, Vol. 39, No. 3 (Spring 2014), pp. 709-733

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"Hence one of the immanent tensions of secular rule: the political, legal, and institutional discourses and practices that attempt to separate private religion from public politics necessitate the constant trespass of the boundary between religion and politics, and between public and private, that secular government ostensibly seeks to establish. Beyond this initial tension, however, lies a second one: secularization requires the constant surveillance of the private spaces to which religion has been assigned in order to verify that subjects (Muslims in this instance) are, in fact, being properly religious. These, then, are the contradictory imperatives of secular rule: to separate and to surveil, to make private and to regulate"

Intimacy Surveilled: Religion, Sex, and Secular Cunning

Mayanthi L. Fernando

Signs, Vol. 39, No. 3 (Spring 2014), pp. 685-708

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"For my generation of feminists, this changing context was dazzling. While we were learning from Foucault, Lyotard, Deleuze, and Derrida about the mutation of capitalism from an industrial to an information society, we could also see all around us the effects of this transformation on intellectual and academic life."

Thinking with an Accent: Françoise Collin, Les cahiers du Grif, and French Feminism, Rosi Braidotti

Signs , Vol. 39, No. 3 (Spring 2014) , pp. 597-626

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"…it must be acknowledged that the discussion of ideas is impeded primarily by the unilingualism of English speaking feminists who for the most part do not feel the need to open themselves up to other perspectives and cultural realities. This is especially true because the dominance of the English language removes the need for English-speaking students and academics to learn another language. A corollary to this is that libraries, archives, and bookstores are reluctant to purchase works giving access to other sociolinguistic voices due to the lack of demand or interest. Under the circumstances, it would not be an exaggeration to say that if a text is not published in English, it does not exist."

Language Is Not Neutral: The Construction of Knowledge in the Social Sciences and Humanities
Francine Descarries

Signs , Vol. 39, No. 3 (Spring 2014) , pp. 564-569

Click HERE to view in JSTOR

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