Quote
"Intended to dissimulate, the veil ends up exposing, and in so doing it oversexualizes women, confirming the presence of an inegalitarian gender system based on sexual difference and sexual inequality."

Intimacy Surveilled: Religion, Sex, and Secular Cunning

Mayanthi L. Fernando

Signs, Vol. 39, No. 3 (Spring 2014), pp. 685-708

Click HERE to view in JSTOR

Twitter Facebook

Quote
"To the extent that violent masculine identities stem from racist institutions and practices and from inadequate resources within the dark ghetto, it is unreasonable to expect boys and men simply to refrain from violence. And to the extent that institutional deficiencies stem from racist dynamics in society at large, it does not make sense to impose the obligation to address violence on the black community alone."

Telling It Just Like It Is: The Tragicomedy of the 1965 Voting Rights Act

Stephen Houston Marshall

Signs, Vol. 39, No. 3 (Spring 2014), pp. 709-733

Click HERE to view in JSTOR

Twitter Facebook

Quote
"Hence one of the immanent tensions of secular rule: the political, legal, and institutional discourses and practices that attempt to separate private religion from public politics necessitate the constant trespass of the boundary between religion and politics, and between public and private, that secular government ostensibly seeks to establish. Beyond this initial tension, however, lies a second one: secularization requires the constant surveillance of the private spaces to which religion has been assigned in order to verify that subjects (Muslims in this instance) are, in fact, being properly religious. These, then, are the contradictory imperatives of secular rule: to separate and to surveil, to make private and to regulate"

Intimacy Surveilled: Religion, Sex, and Secular Cunning

Mayanthi L. Fernando

Signs, Vol. 39, No. 3 (Spring 2014), pp. 685-708

Click HERE to view in JSTOR

Twitter Facebook

Quote
"For my generation of feminists, this changing context was dazzling. While we were learning from Foucault, Lyotard, Deleuze, and Derrida about the mutation of capitalism from an industrial to an information society, we could also see all around us the effects of this transformation on intellectual and academic life."

Thinking with an Accent: Françoise Collin, Les cahiers du Grif, and French Feminism, Rosi Braidotti

Signs , Vol. 39, No. 3 (Spring 2014) , pp. 597-626

Click HERE to view on JSTOR

Twitter, Facebook

Quote
"…it must be acknowledged that the discussion of ideas is impeded primarily by the unilingualism of English speaking feminists who for the most part do not feel the need to open themselves up to other perspectives and cultural realities. This is especially true because the dominance of the English language removes the need for English-speaking students and academics to learn another language. A corollary to this is that libraries, archives, and bookstores are reluctant to purchase works giving access to other sociolinguistic voices due to the lack of demand or interest. Under the circumstances, it would not be an exaggeration to say that if a text is not published in English, it does not exist."

Language Is Not Neutral: The Construction of Knowledge in the Social Sciences and Humanities
Francine Descarries

Signs , Vol. 39, No. 3 (Spring 2014) , pp. 564-569

Click HERE to view in JSTOR

Twitter Facebook

Quote
"In particular, academics working in English tend not to consider the complex process that goes into translating texts into English. Indeed, this lack of reflection sustains the illusion that the social world is produced and mediated in English and demands that non-English speakers conform to the linguistic norms of the English language with English-speaking writers reading the end product of these translated texts as simply an authentic reflection of the original."

A Politics of Feminist Translation: Using Translation to Understand Gendered Meaning-Making in Research
Ingrid Palmary
Signs , Vol. 39, No. 3 (Spring 2014) , pp. 576-580
Click HERE to view in JSTOR

Photo
"As a French-speaking Belgian, Collin never quite fit into any nationally indexed classification system. She was first and foremost a sharp critical spirit, an activist, and a multifaceted writer. This stance of defiant independence—even at the cost of marginalization—as well as her intellectual gifts are what made her attractive to younger feminists.2”
Thinking with an Accent: Françoise Collin, Les cahiers du Grif, and French Feminism, Rosi Braidotti
Signs , Vol. 39, No. 3 (Spring 2014) , pp. 597-626
Click HERE to view on JSTOR, Photo Credit: HERE 

Twitter Facebook

"As a French-speaking Belgian, Collin never quite fit into any nationally indexed classification system. She was first and foremost a sharp critical spirit, an activist, and a multifaceted writer. This stance of defiant independence—even at the cost of marginalization—as well as her intellectual gifts are what made her attractive to younger feminists.2

Thinking with an Accent: Françoise Collin, Les cahiers du Grif, and French Feminism, Rosi Braidotti

Signs , Vol. 39, No. 3 (Spring 2014) , pp. 597-626

Click HERE to view on JSTOR, Photo Credit: HERE

Photo
"Faced with skeptical audiences in conferences, classrooms, and other academic sites, Portuguese WGFS scholars very frequently do just that: explicitly highlight that they are not the author of a claim or the only person studying something but that it is also said and done abroad:


[Name of social science discipline] has been developed from the perspective of men, seen as universal. … This has been denounced, and it wasn’t me who said this, it’s well demonstrated in foreign literature. (PhD candidate speaking during the PhD defense for a feminist thesis in a mainstream social science)17
I’d argue that it’s important to critically reflect about feminism and political institutions in Portugal. This is not an idea that has come from my head: many, many international researchers have raised that question. (WGFS researcher giving a paper at a non-WGFS social science conference)”

— The Importance of Being “Modern” and Foreign: Feminist Scholarship and the Epistemic Status of Nations
Maria do Mar Pereira
Signs, Vol. 39, No. 3 (Spring 2014), pp. 627-657

Click HERE to view on JSTOR

Twitter, Facebook

"Faced with skeptical audiences in conferences, classrooms, and other academic sites, Portuguese WGFS scholars very frequently do just that: explicitly highlight that they are not the author of a claim or the only person studying something but that it is also said and done abroad:

[Name of social science discipline] has been developed from the perspective of men, seen as universal. … This has been denounced, and it wasn’t me who said this, it’s well demonstrated in foreign literature. (PhD candidate speaking during the PhD defense for a feminist thesis in a mainstream social science)17

I’d argue that it’s important to critically reflect about feminism and political institutions in Portugal. This is not an idea that has come from my head: many, many international researchers have raised that question. (WGFS researcher giving a paper at a non-WGFS social science conference)”

— The Importance of Being “Modern” and Foreign: Feminist Scholarship and the Epistemic Status of Nations
Maria do Mar Pereira
Signs, Vol. 39, No. 3 (Spring 2014), pp. 627-657
Click HERE to view on JSTOR

(Source: commons.wikimedia.org)

Quote
"If normal sex is private sex, these secular Muslim women must nonetheless prove their normality precisely by bringing their sex lives into the public sphere for monetized consumption by a literary public."

Intimacy Surveilled: Religion, Sex, and Secular Cunning

Mayanthi L. Fernando

Signs, Vol. 39, No. 3 (Spring 2014), pp. 685-708

Click HERE to view in JSTOR

Twitter Facebook

Quote
"Although many feminist researchers recognize the importance of the language question both in the production of knowledges concerning the world around us and in the interweaving of knowledge and power, translations are still often read as if they were transparent, as if they allowed unmediated access to the originals. But all translations are a rewriting that—whether consciously or unconsciously—transforms the original"

Lola Sánchez, “Translations That Matter: About a Foundational Text in Feminist Studies in Spain”
Signs, Vol. 39, No. 3 (Spring 2014) , pp. 570-76
Click HERE to view in JSTOR