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The Summer 2014 issue of Signs is now available on JSTOR. 
The issue features a symposium on “Gender, Media, and Social Change,” edited by Christina Dunbar-Hester. The symposium examines the multifaceted ways that media of all kinds shape gendered practices, perceptions, and political movements. Other articles continue the theme of gender and media: Cadence Kinsey intervenes into debates around binary and digital representation through the work of artist Nell Tenhaaf. Rose Brister excavates the gendered, racialized, and spacialized politics of Erik Riklas’s film The Syrian Bride, while Tamika Carey critically evaluates the gendered and raced representations at work in Tyler Perry’s films. Articles by Adriane Brown and Mary E. Thomas and by Clare Daniel examine the role of the Internet and social media in shaping gendered selves: Brown and Thomas analyze queer girls’ MySpace pages, and Daniel investigates the role of social media in online anti-teen pregnancy campaigns. 
Read more about the issue here or view the issue itself on JSTOR.

The Summer 2014 issue of Signs is now available on JSTOR

The issue features a symposium on “Gender, Media, and Social Change,” edited by Christina Dunbar-Hester. The symposium examines the multifaceted ways that media of all kinds shape gendered practices, perceptions, and political movements. Other articles continue the theme of gender and media: Cadence Kinsey intervenes into debates around binary and digital representation through the work of artist Nell Tenhaaf. Rose Brister excavates the gendered, racialized, and spacialized politics of Erik Riklas’s film The Syrian Bride, while Tamika Carey critically evaluates the gendered and raced representations at work in Tyler Perry’s films. Articles by Adriane Brown and Mary E. Thomas and by Clare Daniel examine the role of the Internet and social media in shaping gendered selves: Brown and Thomas analyze queer girls’ MySpace pages, and Daniel investigates the role of social media in online anti-teen pregnancy campaigns.

Read more about the issue here or view the issue itself on JSTOR.

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"Yet language is much more than a code. It is at once a reference system and a cultural vehicle that represents reality and what we have to say in a singular and symbolic way."

Language Is Not Neutral: The Construction of Knowledge in the Social Sciences and Humanities
Francine Descarries

Signs , Vol. 39, No. 3 (Spring 2014) , pp. 564-569

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"Grounded translation is equally directed at naming, critiquing, and countering patriarchy but is often characterized by its focus on the production of dramatic effect rather than one-to-one correspondence of meaning. Very often such translation successfully co-opts the nuances of local, everyday language in order to heighten particular inflections of meaning in the translated concept or idea. Most important, it reinvests older and familiar concepts with newer layers of meaning to exploit the many different senses it may communicate."

Getting beyond the Governmental Fix in Kerala
J. Devika
Signs , Vol. 39, No. 3 (Spring 2014) , pp. 580-584
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"To the people in the places where theories are received, the questions should be: Where are those theories produced? Where do they come from? What is the relationship between geohistorical location and knowledge production? What are their local histories? How are such theories expressed when they travel through regional differences? Are they just repeated in a new scenarios, or do they face new limits?"

Toward an Alternative Traveling Theory
Min Dongchao
Signs , Vol. 39, No. 3 (Spring 2014) , pp. 584-592
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"Les cahiers du Grif combined the highest standards of intellectual rigor with flights of invention that inspired us and freed our own theoretical imagination. The journal embodied the perfect mixture of the theoretical and the political—it was smart and intellectually up to date but also engaged in a militant vein that echoed our own activism. It connected the intellectual feminist elites with the militant base of the movement. For us, Collin’s group was the substitute for a feminist graduate school that did not exist in the institutions as yet."

Thinking with an Accent: Françoise Collin, Les cahiers du Grif, and French Feminism, Rosi Braidotti

Signs , Vol. 39, No. 3 (Spring 2014) , pp. 597-626

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"Yet framing the headscarf as both a religious duty and a personal decision constitutes a kind of doublespeak for secular republicans, an insidious attempt to mask a fundamentalist agenda with liberal terms."

Intimacy Surveilled: Religion, Sex, and Secular Cunning

Mayanthi L. Fernando

Signs, Vol. 39, No. 3 (Spring 2014), pp. 685-708

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"… it is far more accurate to view racial domination as the political project that grounds and authorizes disenfranchisement, economic exploitation, lynching, and sexual violation as civic practices across jurisdictions in the South. Electoral disenfranchisement formalized the expulsion of African Americans from Southern states and localities, isolating them from national consideration and extinguishing most of the conventional institutional means by which they could advance their interests or visit consequences upon their rivals and enemies."

Telling It Just Like It Is: The Tragicomedy of the 1965 Voting Rights Act

Stephen Houston Marshall

Signs, Vol. 39, No. 3 (Spring 2014), pp. 709-733

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"Today, in the field of women’s studies, as elsewhere,
Anglo-Saxon countries exert a virtual monopoly on knowledge dissemination and its evaluation. This hegemony leads to the marginalization of large segments of feminist thought worldwide and also reinforces the isolation of researchers on the national or linguistic periphery by limiting their capacity to enter into a dialogue with the center or to advance their ideas."

Language Is Not Neutral: The Construction of Knowledge in the Social Sciences and Humanities
Francine Descarries

Signs , Vol. 39, No. 3 (Spring 2014) , pp. 564-569

Click HERE to view in JSTOR

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As a special open-access feature in conjunction with the comparative perspective symposium on “Translation, Feminist Scholarship, and the Hegemony of English,” Signs and the University of Chicago Press are making five of the symposium essays available in international languages. Visit the Signs blog for links to essays in Chinese, French, Malayalam, and Spanish. Or download them as a single PDF via JSTOR (click “View PDF”). The English versions are also available to subscribers via JSTOR. 

As a special open-access feature in conjunction with the comparative perspective symposium on “Translation, Feminist Scholarship, and the Hegemony of English,” Signs and the University of Chicago Press are making five of the symposium essays available in international languages. Visit the Signs blog for links to essays in Chinese, French, Malayalam, and Spanish. Or download them as a single PDF via JSTOR (click “View PDF”). The English versions are also available to subscribers via JSTOR

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Kim Anno, photograph, National Geographic in fish tank, with ink and debris, 20” x 30” (2010). © 2010 by Kim Anno.
Permission to reprint may be obtained only from the artist. This work appears on the Spring 2014 issue of Signs.
In this photograph, Anno recognizes the complex history of national geographic magazine with its colonial past and environmental-action present and uses the sublime character of falling ink a tank of water to spoil it.

Kim Anno, photograph, National Geographic in fish tank, with ink and debris, 20” x 30” (2010). © 2010 by Kim Anno.

Permission to reprint may be obtained only from the artist. This work appears on the Spring 2014 issue of Signs.

In this photograph, Anno recognizes the complex history of national geographic magazine with its colonial past and environmental-action present and uses the sublime character of falling ink a tank of water to spoil it.